Taxonomy

Quercus robur | Pedunculate Oak | Dair ghallda

Distribution

Status

Conservation status

Not protected

Native status

Native

Species Biology

Identification

Flowers: May; catkins and flowers

Fruits: Acorns borne on stalks >1.5cm long

Twigs & bark:  Twigs grey; bark grey and fissured when mature

Habitat

Woodland and hedges, fen margins, prefers heavy alkaline soils 

Life cycle

Perennial

Ex-situ conservation

Not known

Use

Forest crop

Vegetative nature

Woody

Distribution

World distribution(GBIF)

Irish distribution

Very frequent, especially on richer soils, often planted

Temporal change

Records submitted to Data Centre in 2021

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Further information

A Forest crop, Quercus robur was named for its sturdy nature ('robur' means 'strength' in Latin). It can take as long as 150 years before an oak is ready for use in construction. Oak became the material of choice for building ships, oak bark has been used in leather tanning and in dyeing, and the acorns are valued as food for livestock. Celts believed that doors made of oak wood kept out evil spirits. One of our largest long-lived trees, it provides an important habitat for many other species.