Taxonomy

Fraxinus excelsior | Ash | Fuinseog

Distribution

Status

Conservation status

Not protected

Native status

Native

Species Biology

Identification

Flowers: April – May; clusters of small blackish flowers

Fruits: Clusters of single-winged seeds often called ‘ash keys’

Twigs & bark: Twigs grey; bark grey and smooth then furrowed when mature

Habitat

Hedges, woods and rocky places, especially on limestone soils

Life cycle

Perennial

Ex-situ conservation

Not known

Use

Forest crop

Vegetative nature

Woody

Distribution

World distribution(GBIF)

Irish distribution

Widespread and common

Temporal change

Records submitted to Data Centre in 2020

The following map is interactive. If you would prefer to view it full screen then click here.

Further information

The rapid growth and re-sprouting ability of Ash after coppicing made it a valuable resource in the past, taking only 10 years before being re-cut. Its wood has been widely used in construction and in the making of furniture, tool handles, oars, hurleys and snooker cues due to its flexibility, strength and resistance to splitting. however the species is now under serious threat from an imported fungal parasite called ash die-back. it is predicted to kill 90-99% of all Irish Ash trees unless a solution is found.

Images